Linda Hall Library
Science Engineering Technology

Lemuel Roscoe Cleveland

Lemuel Roscoe Cleveland, an American protozoologist, was born Nov. 14, 1892. Cleveland is known to historians of astronomy as an odd footnote; in 1924, when Edwin Hubble presented a paper at a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), proving that the Andromeda nebula is in fact a galaxy just like our own Milky Way, he was awarded the AAAS Thousand Dollar Prize, a recently established award given for the best paper presented at the annual meeting…

Raphael Sanzio

Raphael Sanzio, the great Renaissance artist, was born Apr. 6, 1483. If you dispute this date (some do), we note that Raphael died on Apr. 6 (no dispute here), so one way or the other, this is the correct day to pay tribute. Sometime between 1509…

Orra White Hitchcock

Orra White Hitchcock, an American illustrator, was born Mar. 8, 1796.  Orra is the earliest accomplished American-born woman scientific artist, the equivalent, in many ways, of the more-famous European, Maria Sibylla Merian. Orra was married to Edward Hitchcock, one...

Emile-Antoine Bayard

Émile-Antoine Bayard, a French book illustrator, was born Nov. 2, 1837. Bayard did the original wood engravings for the sequel to Jules Verne’s De la terre à la lune (From the Earth to the Moon, 1865), which was called Autour de la lune (Around the Moon, 1870)....

Alfred Wegener

Alfred Wegener, a German meteorologist, was born Nov. 1, 1880. In 1912, Wegener published several papers in which he postulated that the earth’s continents, 200 million years ago, were amassed in a super-continent that he called Pangaea (first image). He...