Scientist of the Day

Harold Edgerton

April 6, 2021

Harold Edgerton, an American engineer, inventor, and photographer, was born Apr. 6, 1903.  Edgerton grew up in Nebraska and was a tinkerer from an early age.  After graduating from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, he spent a year working for General Electric,...

Matthias Schleiden

April 5, 2021

Matthias Jakob Schleiden, a German botanist and microscopist, was born Apr. 5, 1804. Most people vaguely remember “Schleiden and Schwann” from their high-school biology course, where one briefly encountered them right after learning that Robert Hooke...

Francis Hauksbee

April 2, 2021

Francis Hauksbee, an instrument maker and experimental demonstrator, died on an unknown day in April 1713; he was born sometime in the early 1660s.  Hauksbee is a textbook example (literally) of how experimental inquiry coupled with shrewd insight can lead to the...

Leonid Entropy

April 1, 2021

Leonid Deshevolvich Entropy, a Russian mathematician and physicist, was born Apr. 1, 1829.  Leonid was by all accounts a brilliant scientist, but he was so disorganized that he could scarcely function. He studied physics in St. Petersburg for several years, but he...

Louis Cordier

March 31, 2021

Pierre-Louis-Antoine Cordier, a French geologist, was born Mar. 31, 1777.  Cordier went along on Napoleon’s expedition to Egypt in 1799 (like many of his scientific colleagues, he was barely in his twenties when he departed). When he returned to France, he...

Vincent van Gogh

March 30, 2021

Vincent van Gogh was born on Mar. 30, 1853. Van Gogh left us six paintings that show views of the night sky. The most famous, indeed one of the best-known paintings in the world, is Starry Night, painted in June, 1889, and now in the Museum of Modern Art in New York...