Scientist of the Day

Crawford Long

November 1, 2019

Crawford Long, an American physician, was born on November 1, 1815 in Danielsville, Georgia (first image). The studious son of a wealthy merchant, he enrolled in Franklin College – as the University of Georgia was then known – at the age of 14. Despite his...

Martinus Slabber

October 31, 2019

Martinus Slabber, a Dutch public official and amateur naturalist, was born Oct. 31, 1740.  Slabber is not very well known outside of the Netherlands – there is no English Wikipedia article that discusses him, for example – but we have a remarkable book by Slabber in...

Orson Welles and H.G. Wells

October 30, 2019

On Oct. 30, 1938, the Mercury Theatre on the Air went on the air with a broadcast called “The War of the Worlds.”  The show was the brainchild of Orson Wells, based on the 1898 novel by his near namesake, H.G. Wells (second image).  Everyone knows the...

Walter Raleigh

October 29, 2019

Sir Walter Raleigh, an English courtier and explorer, died Oct. 29, 1618, losing his head to the executioner’s ax; his birth date is not known.  However you define a “scientist,” Raleigh was not one, but he contributed to scientific knowledge by: a)...

Desiderius Erasmus

October 28, 2019

Desiderius Erasmus, a Renaissance scholar, was born Oct. 28, 1466 (or perhaps 1469). Erasmus was the greatest Christian humanist of the 16th century. He translated the New Testament from the Greek, wrote a tremendously popular book, The Praise of Folly, which attacked...

Robert Stirling

October 25, 2019

Robert Stirling, a Scottish cleric and mechanical engineer, was born Oct. 25, 1790.  We don’t know how effective Stirling was as a minister, but as an inventor, he was devilishly clever.  In 1816, working with his brother James, he invented, and secured a patent...