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A Deeper Dive: The Scientific Study of the Plate Tectonics History of the World

November 5, 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

We have reached our seating capacity for this event. If you are unable to attend the lecture in person, you can watch a live broadcast from the Library’s Facebook page or via livestream.com.

 

This course will be held in the Regnier Center, Room 101 D, at
Johnson County Community College, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park, Kansas 66210.
Classes will meet from 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on November 5, 12, and 19.

 

About Deeper Dive Courses

The Library’s Deeper Dive programs are three-part courses that take in-depth looks into important science topics. The small class settings are ideal for audience interaction with expert faculty members. The course is free and open to the public. Registraton is for all three classes. Seating is limited.

Plate Tectonics Course Description

The geological discoveries and principles that reveal the plate-tectonic history of the earth are astonishing and head-spinningly complex. Throughout earth’s history, tectonic plates have skated over the globe and have been driven into massive collisions with one another by heat convection currents over a thousand miles deep. In those collisions, the rocks of the plates have been deformed, compressed, metamorphosed, eroded and deformed again and again. In this series of Deeper Dive talks, we will explore at a rather intense level some of the brilliant scientific tools used by geologists to understand the formation of the crust, the motions of plates, and the consequences of plate collisions. The foundation of the three individual discussions will be the three-billion-year-old rocks of northern Scotland, which preserve vivid, visible evidence of more collisions than almost anywhere else in the world.

  • November 5 – How Do We Know? The Geologic History of Northern Scotland at Three Billion Years Ago
    Watch a live broadcast from the Library’s Facebook page or via livestream.com.

    The first Deeper Dive session will focus on the earliest geologic history of the earth and of Northern Scotland in particular, by digging down into some of the scientific techniques that tell Scotland’s three-billion-year story. Incredible detective work with radioactive isotopes, phenomenal chemical trace-element studies of some quite-boring looking rocks, and beautiful studies of minerals that make up the rocks combine to tell how our earth first developed a crust.
  • November 12 – What Facts Do We Have?: The Geologic History of Northern Scotland Between One and Three Billion Years Ago
    Watch a live broadcast from the Library’s Facebook page or via livestream.com.

    The second session will cover the history of the middle two billion years in Northern Scotland, including the deductions based upon the scientific principles and techniques presented in the first Deep Dive. It will show that Scotland once hosted a part of one of the tallest mountain ranges in the world.  And it will show how we know how tall they were, based on data available in present-day rocks.
  • November 19 – What Can We Conclude?: The Recent Geologic History of Northern Scotland from One Billion Years Ago to the Present
    Watch a live broadcast from the Library’s Facebook page or via livestream.com.

    The third and final session will cover the latest billion years in the geology of Northern Scotland, including another whole mountain range being thrust up and being eroded completely away during the formation and subsequent breakup of the supercontinent Pangea. Breaking up can be hard, but in any case, the consequences of this breakup have been, and continue to be, profound. We will also take a deeper dive into the science behind the fossil record. For a finishing touch, we will discuss earthquakes, volcanoes, and a few present-day popular myths.

The Instructor

Bill Shefchik was a geologist at Burns & McDonnell Engineering Company, in Kansas City, for over 36 years. During that time, he investigated the geology beneath over 500 projects—power plants, large dams, airports, bridges, water treatment plants, wastewater treatment plants, factories, railroads, solar farms, wind farms, sanitary landfills, and hazardous waste sites. Some projects required a one-page memorandum, others were months- and years-long investigations resulting in multi-volume reports.

Mr. Shefchik’s specialty was engineering geology in conditions of unstable ground, including severe karst environments, abandoned underground mines, fault zones, and ground fissure zones in areas of significant groundwater withdrawal in the desert southwest. He also designed and implemented major groundwater remediation well fields, which have caused the cleanup of over eight billion gallons of contaminated groundwater. He also contributed to investigation and groundwater cleanup at several dozen contaminated industrial sites and several petroleum refineries.

He provided conceptual design and oversight expertise to the structural backfilling of numerous abandoned underground mines, most of which occurred beneath sensitive surface infrastructure (railroads, highways, streets). Over the last 20 years of his career, he served as a geology expert witness on behalf of over 25 clients, providing technical analysis and support (defining the geological facts of the case at contaminated soil and groundwater sites), plus testimony in several dozen depositions, in mediation attempts, and in court, to assist the parties in reaching fair settlements of their disputes.

Mr. Shefchik earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in geology from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.

Dates, Times, and Location

The class will meet from 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. on November 5, 12, and 19 in the Regnier Center, Room 101 D, at Johnson County Community College, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park Kansas 66210.

Admission Tickets

We have reached our seating capacity for this event. If you are unable to attend the lecture in person, you can watch a live broadcast from the Library’s Facebook page or via livestream.com.

Parking

Parking is available in the garage connected to the Regnier building. Parking is also available in the nearby lot.

This program is funded by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation.
Its content is solely the responsibility of the Linda Hall Library.

Details

Date:
November 5
Time:
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Event Category:
Event Tags:
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Organizer

Linda Hall Library
Phone:
816.926.8753
Website:
www.lindahall.org

Venue

Regnier Center, JCCC Room RC 101D
12345 College Blvd
Overland Park, KS 66210 United States
+ Google Map
Phone:
913-469-4445

Questions? Contact Eric Ward at 816.926.8753 for more information about these events.

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