War Fare: Modern Food, Moral Food

Helen Veit, associate professor of history at Michigan State University, weaves together cultural history and the history of science to bring readers into the strange and complex world of the American Progressive Era. The era’s emphasis on science and self-control left a profound mark on American eating, one that remains today in everything from the ubiquity of science-based dietary advice to the tenacious idealization of thinness.

Presented in partnership with the National WWI Museum and Memorial.

Edward Teller

Edward Teller, a Hungarian/American physicist, was born Jan. 15, 1908, in Budapest. He came to this country in 1933, at the invitation of George Gamow at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. In 1939, he was among the first American physicists to realize the...

Edward George Bowen

Edward George Bowen, a Welsh physicist, was born Jan. 14, 1912. Bowen, who has usually called by his nickname “Taffy”, was primarily responsible for the invention and development of radar in Britain during the period between 1935 and 1940. The idea of...

Jean-Theodore Descourtilz

Jean-Théodore Descourtilz, a French naturalist and bird illustrator, died Jan. 13, 1855, at the age of about 57. Descourtilz travelled to Brazil in 1826 and began drawing the native birds. By 1834, he had collected enough paintings to publish Oiseaux brillans du...

Joan Baptista van Helmont

Joan Baptista van Helmont, a Flemish physician, was born Jan. 12, 1579. Van Helmont (alternatively referred to as Jan Baptist van Helmont) was a strong proponent for what was called, in his day, iatrochemistry, or medical chemistry. Medicine since the time of Galen in...