Eve Curie

Eve Curie, writer, biographer, and public spokesperson for the women of France, was born Dec. 6, 1904. Eve was the younger daughter of Marie and Pierre Curie, sister to Irène Joliot-Curie, and sister-in-law to Frédéric Joliot-Curie, all of whom had been awarded Nobel...

The Living Sea: How a Group of Women Botanists Proved that Coral Reefs are Alive, 1880-1930

Anna Weber-van Bosse was the first woman to be included as an official member of the scientific staff of an oceanographic expedition. She was responsible for studying the marine flora during the Siboga expedition (1899-1900), a Dutch government sponsored scientific exploration of the oceans of modern day Indonesia. Emily Hutcheson, a doctoral candidate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will explore how scientists including Anna Weber-van Bosse and Ethel Barton Gepp, reframed the discussion of coral reefs from geological structures to living units, thus shaping the modern concept of the reef ecosystem.

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Clara Immerwahr

Clara Immerwahr, a German physical chemist, was born on June 21, 1870 to a middle-class Jewish family outside of Breslau (present-day Wrocław, Poland). Her father had studied chemistry but was unable to pursue an academic career due to his religious background....

Alexine Tinné

Alexine Tinné, a Dutch heiress and explorer, was born Oct. 17, 1835. Her father died when she was young, leaving her mother, the Baroness Henriette, one of the wealthiest women in the Netherlands. Mother and daughter travelled extensively about Europe when Alexine was in her mid-teens, which would not have been noteworthy, except they travelled without the company of men…

Augusta Klumpke

Augusta Marie Klumpke, born in San Francisco on Oct. 15, 1859, distinguished herself as a physician in Paris at a time when women were barred from such positions. Having moved to Europe at the age of 12 with her mother and five siblings, she showed an early interest...